Monday Musings 8/1

I can’t stop doing these. I stopped for one week, and I felt that sweaty, sinking feeling typically associated with when your favorite Netflix show runs out of episodes (for me it was Stranger Things). I have so many projects I’m working on, but if I don’t update this blog and author site, I feel like I’ve abandoned a piece of my identity to the great abyss of cyberspace. The appropriate image that haunts me is a little boy clad in a torn raincoat, tromping down a dark alley with a half-torn teddy bear dangling from his pale hand.

  1. If you haven’t watched Netflix’s Stranger Things, you have not watched one of the most well-conceived horror, science fiction, and family friendly stories of the last decade. I loved this show. It was right up my alley. Usually, because of my highly analytical and sometimes critical mind (thank you galaxy of literature courses from my incomplete degree), whenever I watch a fictional story of this style, which I dabble in on a regular basis with my own writing, I find some flaw or irregularity with it. Not saying I’m a perfect storyteller by any means, but having my own monsters forces me to examine others. There was nothing wrong with Stranger Things. It was fantastic. I watched it with my whole family. I let my kids stay up late to watch the episodes. We finished it in three nights. The best thing about this nice piece of American Magical Realism was that morality takes over the fantastical. You’re more entranced by the ethics of the innocent children than you are the science fiction elements leaping at you from the shadows. This is what horror should do for storytelling. It should bring out little truths of human behavior for us to relate to.
  2. Being a writer means you accumulate writer friends. This is sometimes a benefit, though at times I feel like the many crows dangling on a power line drooling above a half-decayed deer. You see these other writers on Facebook, which if you’re a writer, it typically becomes a void, a mindless self-promotion tool for your latest story. Other times writers tend to write clever little diatribes about their actual jobs, or mundane experiences. I don’t get this. I’ve tried to do this. I’ve tried to do it many times. I just hate myself for it. It doesn’t feel honest. Writing narrative is supposed to express those opinions, not a status update. I feel like I’m betraying my craft and personality if I scribble clever stories about the unnatural hum of a stoplight between two molding skyscrapers.
  3. I’ve discovered an equation that occurs in modern communication. Whenever someone utters the words: “I don’t care about being politically correct,” you’re practically guaranteed a hateful, arrogant, racist, and bigot-laden statement from some bygone era. Here is a more basic representation of the equation: Human + “I don’t care about being politically correct” = Hateful and Uneducated Opinion from the Dark Ages. I don’t think people really understand that being politically correct was spawned and nourished out of a very rare idea — respect. Political correctness was created so people could actually have logical discussions about human existence without using hate and judgement as a evidence towards a particular belief.
  4. I’m constantly thinking about the future of writing and reading. Where are the readers at? Oddly, they’re everywhere, but at the same time nowhere to be found. Being a writer is like wandering through some dark-sharp castle with a booming voice echoing directions to you from empty hallways. Because writing is a craft, a learned skill, and a instinct, you’re a subject of a dozen different opinions about how you should do it. It sucks. There is not a perfect formula. This isn’t a math equation. You have the power to do anything you want, yet, will anyone want to use your narrative energy to power their lights? There are a million other sources of power, what makes yours resonate with me?
  5.  Dol 39 Kindle form is just around the corner. I’ll probably release it in October close to Crypticon 2016. Also, the Greenland Diaries will be launching as a Podcast in about a month or so. Be sure to check it out. Bob who will be my co-creator has an excellent voice and puts on a good production. Looking forward to sharing it with everyone! Have a great week.
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5 thoughts on “Monday Musings 8/1

  1. #3 is definitely true. Any time someone starts with, “I’m sure this would be considered politically incorrect”, they are about to say something that is racist, sexist, etc . Those tend to be the same people who whine about how “sensitive” we’ve all gotten. My retort to that is always, “If I’m sensitive, what are you? What is the opposite of sensitive again?”. Exactly.

    I’ve been meaning to check out Stranger Things. Perhaps when my kids are back in school there will be time for catching up on programs. Anything else you’d recommend?

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    1. Currently, I’m watching Bates Motel. Due to my four children, my wife and I are lucky to get in more than one or two a week, but since I’m a fan of Alfred Hitchcock’s original film, I thought I would give it a shot. So far so good, I think we’re on the 2nd season. There is a fair amount of nature vs nurture arguments that occur within the show. Is Norman just a product of his insanely controlling mother? Is his own psychological abnormality causing her to treat him this way? Would Norman be okay in a different environment? They try to look at multiple perspectives in this legendary story. Sadly, there is a fair amount of teenage angst that occurs as backdrop to this show, sort of CW style, but not really. Still, I recommend it. Thank you for commenting 🙂

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